Leadership for Change

April 8th, 2010 - Posted in 2009, Dimensions by Katie McCarthy

IN THIS ISSUE
November/December 2009

At a time of financial challenge, when a CEO’s first tendency might be to hunker down and ride out the storm, it may seem counterintuitive to pursue renewal, form new partnerships, and make long-range plans. But according to our November/December contributors, leaders who keep their institutions focused outward and forward in this way may be doing just what it takes to guarantee long-term survival. In this issue, we analyze the art of adaptive leadership, discover how the Noyce Leadership Institute program is helping its CEO Fellows strengthen themselves and their communities, learn how two Fellows have been applying NLI lessons in their institutions, and recall some high points of ASTC leadership over the past three decades.

Contents
• Leading for Continuity and Change, by Lynn Luckow
The Practice of Leadership in a Changing Environment, by Julie I. Johnson and Randy C. Roberts
• Referents for Renewal: Finding Inspiration in Unlikely Places, by Dennis Bartels
• A Fellowship of Leaders: Building a Community to Serve Communities, by Jennifer Zoffel
• The Business of Leadership: Lessons for CEOs in Hard Times, by Kirk Ramsay
• ASTC Exhibition Services: Advancing the Science Center Movement, by Wendy Pollock
• Passing the Helm: Bonnie VanDorn’s Legacy, by Nancy Stueber

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The Practice of Leadership in a Changing Environment

April 8th, 2010 - Posted in 2009, Dimensions by Katie McCarthy

By Julie I. Johnson and Randy C. Roberts
From ASTC Dimensions
November/December 2009

“Leadership is not a job or a position, but a way of influencing others towards ends recognized as valuable and fulfilling.”

—Amanda Sinclair, Leadership for the Disillusioned: Moving Beyond Myths and Heroes to Leading That Liberates

Who are the leaders in your organization? Close your eyes and think for a moment. Who is the first person that comes to mind? Is it your director/president? Someone from senior management? The coordinator of community outreach? What about the head of security or the ticket taker at the front door? Is it you?

We often think of the words leader and director in the same breath, but this way of thinking sets up a situation where staff members across the institution treat the identified leader with such deference that they abdicate their own power to make a difference in achieving organizational outcomes. Those who are not in positions of assigned authority may tend to wait for vision and direction from “on high,” rather than taking initiative to create positive change.
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Taking a Stand: Science Centers and Issues Advocacy

March 30th, 2010 - Posted in 2009, Dimensions by Christine Ruffo

IN THIS ISSUE
September/October 2009

Climate change, genetic modification of foods, stem cell research, nanotechnology, ocean resource management, alternative energy production—these are just a few of the fields of current scientific and technical endeavor that directly impact human lives. In all of them, choices made by scientists, inventors, entrepreneurs, and government officials both spark public interest and excite controversy. What is the responsibility of science centers to present exhibits and programs on “hot topics” like these? Should we be more active in promoting social applications of scientific knowledge? In this issue we hear from professionals who represent a range of responses.

Contents
• Powerful Words, Strong Commitments, by Lesley Lewis
Aquariums as a Force for Change: New Roles for Conservation and Social Impact, by Julie Packard
• Many Experts, Many Audiences, by Larry Bell, Tiffany Lohwater, and Ellen McCallie
• Convening Conversations about Climate Change: The Adirondack Model, by Stephanie Ratcliffe
• Making Choices: What Visitors Want to Know about Current Science , by Susie Wilkening and James Chung
• Public Dialogue about Science: Creating Successful Experiences, by Kathy Sykes
• From Public Understanding to Public Engagement, by Richard Jones
• Global Warning: Next Steps for the Science Center Field, by Charlie Trautmann, Sheila Grinell, Emlyn Koster, and Kim Cavendish
• When Scientists Take a Stand: Plenary Speakers at ASTC 2009, by Sheila Grinell

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Aquariums as a Force for Change: New Roles in Conservation and Social Impact

March 30th, 2010 - Posted in 2009, Dimensions by Christine Ruffo

By Julie Packard
From ASTC Dimensions
September/October 2009

The last quarter century has brought with it unprecedented and disturbing changes in the health of our aquatic environment, from the collapse of fisheries to dead zones in the oceans. In response, aquariums worldwide have evolved in their missions, and many of us have launched initiatives to advance our conservation role by promoting public awareness of environmental issues and undertaking field conservation work. Some of us have taken our mission a step further, moving from informing and engaging people to mobilizing them to take action on behalf of conservation.

In 2004, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, in Monterey, California, took a bold step in this direction when we launched a new policy and advocacy center, the Center for the Future of the Oceans. Our experiences to date may serve as a useful roadmap for other institutions as they consider expanding their role in conservation and other issues of broad public concern.
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In Any Language: Serving Multilingual Communities

July 30th, 2009 - Posted in 2009, Dimensions by Christine Ruffo

IN THIS ISSUE
July/August 2009

As science centers and museums welcome increasingly diverse audiences, many of them are working to accommodate the linguistic needs of their visitors and to foster a sense of ownership and belonging. Immigrants, indigenous populations, and visitors who are Deaf bring a variety of languages with them to science centers around the world. This issue will explore how centers are recruiting bilingual staff, reaching out to linguistically diverse communities, and constructing multilingual exhibitions, materials, and educational programs.

Contents
In Other Words: Developing Bilingual Exhibitions, by Carlos Plaza
• The Languages of Science in Wales, by Chris Mason
Secrets of Circles: Evaluation of a Trilingual Exhibition, by Sue Allen
• Sharing Yup’ik Language, Knowledge, and Heritage, by Ann Fienup-Riordan
• Language in a Learning Ensemble, by Derlly González and Kristin Leigh
• Challenges for English Medium Instruction in Sri Lanka, by Sean Perera
• Expanding Informal Science Education for Latinos, by Robert L. Russell and Malu Jimenez
• The Self Reliance Foundation and Science Education, by Robert L. Russell
• Addressing Deaf Visitors with an American Sign Language Multimedia Tour, by Christine Reich and Elissa Chin

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